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E-discussion Facilitator
on Tue, February 23, 2016 at 10.35 pm

National Implementation

This discussion is now closed. Thank you for your participation.
 How can the SDGs be effectively mainstreamed into relevant national sustainable development policies and programmes, while preserving countries' policy space to pursue national priorities? How can the UN development system best support this?
 What are key areas for making progress on and building national and sub-national capacities for sustainable development, and how do they differ across country contexts (e.g. least developed countries, middle income countries, high-income countries, countries in situations of fragility etc.)? When and how can partnerships effectively contribute to capacity building and sustainable development?
 What steps are necessary to ensure that all stakeholders, including the government, private sector and civil society can readily exchange information and experiences? How can "peer exchange" be established and nurtured?
Moderator's Message

 

Dear Colleagues,

A very warm welcome to Thematic Window II, “National Implementation”, of the 2016 ECOSOC e-discussion that will take place from 29 February to 25 March 2016. This e-discussion is a unique opportunity for the broader development community to provide critical policy guidance and recommendations for the 2016 ECOSOC session on “Implementing the 2030 Agenda: moving from commitments to results.”

2015 was a landmark year for development as UN Member States reached historic agreements that will guide development priorities for the coming years. Member States have committed to eradicate poverty, fight inequalities, build peaceful, inclusive and resilient societies, and secure the future of the planet and wellbeing of future generations. Now, in 2016 we begin implementation of the bold 2030 Agenda.

The 2030 Agenda calls for transformational change in every country. It will require ‘landing’ the global agenda at national and sub-national level, in according policies, programmes and budgets, to achieve the ambitious SDGs. This will be determined by national priorities and capacities—The UN Development System stands ready to assist countries in this endeavour. In doing so, it acknowledges the imperative of national ownership, with actions of support firmly determined by country needs and national capacities. UN efforts must be flexible to adapt to country contexts.

We strongly encourage participants to share concrete national, subnational or local experiences so as to effectively guide recommendations for implementation over the coming years. I look forward to a lively and rich discussion in the next few weeks!

Best regards,
Pedro Conceicao

 

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E-discussion Facilitator from Brazil
Thu, March 24, 2016 at 09.23 pm

Thank you for your comment. Several of the participants of our e-discussion have commented on the role of inclusive education and training in building capacity to promote sustainable development. I recommend you to check Syeda Hamid's post on teacher education.

Could you share with us what Creative Educators International Network have been doing in order to unite "stakeholders and nations toward the accomplishment of AGENDA 2030"?

The Private University for Medical Sciences
Thu, March 24, 2016 at 05.36 am

I agree totally with what Valerie Ellis wrote, I can stress the point of  positive values & attitudes since there is a lot missed in our societies such as truth , love to read, love to write, tolerance, respect others, respect time, justice, apreciation of other's skills, abilities, capabilities & experiences, respect age ..& many others, this concentration in one way or another on the practical side can reduce violence.

Another point I'd like to stress is the quality of teacher & the ethics of teaching profession which is a reflect of an authentic teaching - learning process.

Kim Gleeson Humanitarian, Journalist and human rights and social justice advocate from Australia
Thu, March 24, 2016 at 03.17 am

Dear Colleagues,

I am concerned by the effectiveness of accountability mechanisms, the ownership of public goods and who will in fact benefit from the engagement of private sector actors in the realization of the SDGs and Financing for Development. There appears to be a keen focus on Private Public Partnerships (PPP) in the realization of these goals, with the reference to the shortfall of funding requirements. Whilst I note that many participants highligh the important role of civil society actors and a free media in the process,  I am concerned by what I perceive to be divergent relations of power and influence in real world settings. National and community ownership, a central role in the decision making process for representative community actors I believe is foundational to advance the SDGs. Co-operative and community ownership structures should be accorded equal status in any and all development financing projects. The process in my view must not create a situation where essentail public goods for example water utilities end up being owned and controlled by private sector actors. Similarly health, education, essential public infrastructures.. et el. There is a global movement towards the ever increasing privatization of public services and goods. Recent new multilateral  trade deals have raised concerns over the arbitration of sovereignty disputes being settled by private sector courts, in disputes involving foundational health, environmental and minimum wage concerns. There already exists in my view a major imbalance of power to realize the public interest concerns of populations in most countries in the world, where inequality has been consistently highlighted as an ever growing reality. Elites exist, are real, and exercise power in every country.  Consultations not yeilding public interest results, supposed participatory mechanisms while the real power remains with elites, selective transparencies have seemed too often to predominant. Too often if there are any accountability mechanisms, they lack resources, staff, operate within very narrow regulatory frameworks,  lack effective enforcement mechanisms or offer tokenistic ones, and are led by management drawn from the pre-existing power relations status quo. For many in the private sector, a self-regulatory framework is the preferred option.  Such realities have led to illicit financial flows, tax avoidance, trade misinvoicing to the tune of hundreds of billions of dollars. This within the preexisting supposed legal frameworks. To address widespread poverty, inequalities and disadvantages truely effective mechanisms must be established to give power and ownership to the people.  So often the solutions offered are top down strategies that benefit most those advantaged by the existing unequal power relations. Bottom up, grassroots, local,  community ownership cannot be just jargon and minimalistic additions. They must be central to realization of all the strategies.

E-discussion Facilitator from Brazil
Thu, March 24, 2016 at 09.16 pm

Thank you for your comment. You suggested that  in order to "address widespread poverty, inequalities and disadvantages truely effective mechanisms must be established to give power and ownership to the people". Can you give us examples of such mechanisms and share lessons learned with their creating? How to ensure community engagement in such initiatives?

Regarding the engagement of the private sector in the realization of the SDGs, the United Nations Global Compact is an important example of how voluntary initiatives guided by the UN system can ensure the implementation of universal sustainability principles and support UN goals through the private sector. More information on the Global Compact can be found at the initiative’s website: https://www.unglobalcompact.org.

Kim Gleeson from
Fri, March 25, 2016 at 02.45 am
UN rights expert urges Liberia not to hand public education over to a private company

GENEVA (22 March 2016) – It is completely unacceptable for Liberia to outsource its primary education system to a private company, said the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the right to education, Kishore Singh. “This is unprecedented at the scale currently being proposed and violates Liberia’s legal and moral obligations,” he stressed.
 
Liberia’s plan is to privatise all primary and pre-primary schools over the next five years. Public funding will support services subcontracted to a private company - the Bridge International Academies. “Public schools and their teachers, and the concept of education as a public good, are under attack,” the expert cautioned.

“Such arrangements are a blatant violation of Liberia’s international obligations under the right to education, and have no justification under Liberia’s constitution,” the Special Rapporteur stated. “This also contradicts political commitments made by Liberia and the international community to the fourth UN Sustainable Development Goal which is on education and related targets.”

“Provision of public education of good quality is a core function of the State. Abandoning this to the commercial benefit of a private company constitutes a gross violation of the right to education,” emphasised Mr. Singh.

The human rights expert noted that “it is ironic that Liberia does not have resources to meet its core obligations to provide a free primary education to every child, but it can find huge sums of money to subcontract a private company to do so on its behalf,” he said.

“These sums could be much better spent on improving the existing system of public education and supporting the educational needs of the poor and marginalized,” suggested the Special Rapporteur.

Mr. Singh called on the Government of Liberia to approach the UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) for technical assistance and capacity building, instead of entering into such partnerships with for-profit providers in education, “devoid of any legal or moral justification.”

“Before any partnership is entered into, the Government of Liberia must first put into place legislation and policies on public private partnerships in education, which among other things, protect every child’s right to education,” Mr. Singh said.

“There also needs to be an independent body or institution established to receive complaints of potential violations of the right to education that might result from this development,” he added.

The Special Rapporteur emphasised that “education is an essential public service and instead of supporting business in education, governments should increase the money they spend on public educational services to make them better.”

- See more at: http://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=18506&LangID=E#sthash.hhQSHGq8.dpuf


http://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=18506

22.3.2016
UN Rights expert urges Liberia not to hand over public education to a private company.

Can you please add this to my last post on the 2030 Agenda. National Implementation. I have been having problems with email or adding onsite. My apologies for any multiple correspondence. I have 'mysteriously' now having problems corresponding..

Regards
Kim Gleeson. Director, Universal Rights Network


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Kim Gleeson from
Thu, March 24, 2016 at 11.20 pm

Dear E-discussion Facilitator,
Thank you for your reply. I am aware of the UN Global Compact Initiative and its voluntary character and whilst I generally support the principles espoused I consider it to be ineffective in realizing its goals to be frank. There is substantial difference between intent and actions. This is a foundational problem, across too many sectors. For example, the Sustainable Development Solutions Network Director's report of the costs to realize the SDGs annually did not include any budgeting at all for social safety net programs, or social protection floor initiatives. Which to be frank beggars belief. When I raised this circumstance with the former director of the Sustainable Development Solutions Network Asia Pacific focal point, he advised for example that the Australian Government did not want to discuss socio-economic rights in the SDGs in our national settings. Similar views by Governments have been evident in other developed countries. Austerity budgeting according to economic rationalists programs advanced by international financial institutions and market orthodoxies have seen social budgets reduced worldwide, with potential further cuts to come. Levels unemployment increase, ongoing pressures to lower minimum wages, pensions falling across the board. The GFC and its consequences were a creation of the market. Companies associated with the Global Compact have also been implicated in offshore tax avoidance. Leading international corporations, from many countries advanced and developing economies, no one seems to have a monopoly on tax avoidance and minimalization schemes instituted by the world's leading financial and accounting firms . We are told shareholders are only seeking to maximize profits for their shareholders. Whilst I acknowledge the needs for funding, I remain alarmed at what I perceive to be the tokenistic regard accorded to any effective accountability mechanisms, the lack of independent oversight, and who indeed will be responsible for protecting the people's interests. I now am unmoved by the notion that career compliant bureaucrats, multinational corporations, and academics whose universities are increasingly dependent on corporate support and fee paying students will uphold the people's interests. I readily acknowledge there are also of course well intentioned, intelligent and many capable people across these arena's in specialized domains. I acknowledge the need to grow the economy and the role of business and the private sector. But the brutal reality of private sector involvement is self interest, profits for shareholders. Whilst lip service will of course be paid to humanistic concerns. The more profits the better is of course the ideal circumstance. Who then exactly will be responsible to balance the ledger in the peoples interest. National Governments, desperate for investment? Ministers, members of parliament looking to their future careers in the corporate sector? The thousands of corporate lobbyists seeking to optimize commercial advantages?
My observation is in fact  many good people with sound intentions exist but are marginalized when there's money to be made. The most compliant will work within the systems to seek incremental change, whilst profound structual inequities remain.

 I do support the SDGs, I have reported on their development for a number of years, as I did with regards to the MDGs. I have actively sought to advance respect and regard for the Universal Declaration of Human Rights for some 20 years. There are many others in many states guided by a commitment to advancing the well being of others, not their own personal self interest or for the profit of shareholders. We work at the coal face so to speak - in community sector agencies, in schools, hospitals, universities. We are the workers, not the factory owners.  We are the ones who will realise the changes the SDGs seek to realise. We need the support. Not business, not politicians, not bureaucrats. Yes of course we must have their support, involvement, commitment. But they cannot be in the drivers seat to trickle down the benefits of economic growth. If there's to be investment in public assets it must remain 51% nationally owned in the public interest. Why can't superannuation, pension funds, banks lend to community owned public infrastructure entities, at a reasonable rate of return, with the ownership retained by for the people? Why is it proposed for such entities to be privatizatized? Why are UN agencies shepharding such developments? The UN Charter, starts with "We the People", let the 2030 Agenda actually be in the people's interests.
I understand there are many dimensions and aspects to the 2030 Agenda. However, I am choosing to focus on one particular dimension on this occasion.



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E-discussion Facilitator from Brazil
Mon, March 28, 2016 at 12.07 am

Thank you for your comment. Fighting corruption has been recognized by participants of our e-discussion as a pivotal area for improvement if countries wish to successfully implement development agendas. Creating effective accountability mechanisms, as you have mentioned, is a crucial step towards that goal.

Rita Luthra from
Mon, March 28, 2016 at 01.24 pm

Please Remove my e-mail from your mailing list

 

Thank you

 

 

Rita Luthra, MD

President

Women's Health and Education Center (WHEC)

NGO in Special Consultative Status with Economic and Social Council of the United Nations

Editor-in-Chief of e-Health Publication

http://www.WomensHealthSection.com

 

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Subject: [World We Want 2030] E-discussion Facilitator from Brazil commented on the Discussion "National Implementation"

 

Kim Gleeson from
Mon, March 28, 2016 at 11.22 am


 Yes fighting corruption is essential and its a multi-dimensional reality, and that includes addressing corporate and regulatory capture of all levels of Governance - international, regional, national, state, sub-state and local.



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[World Humanitarian Summit] E-discussion Facilitator from Brazil commented on the Discussion "National Implementation"
Nadya Dobretsova Researcher, NGO from Kyrgyzstan
Thu, March 24, 2016 at 02.49 am

Key drivers of development in any country, including the Kyrgyz Republic - are the state, business and public sector. Sustainable development in the interests of people becomes the result of balanced and effective interaction of the mentioned three drivers. Moreover, each party must have clear goals, objectives, motives and mechanisms for participation in the development process. Each party must have clear understanding of each other’s roles and contributions to the development, which is impossible without a clear framework for cooperation and an enabling environment for operation of each of the parties with maximum efficiency. By 2016 the Kyrgyz Republic has a situation when the roles, contributions and enabling environment are formed only in respect of the state (to a greater extent) and business (to a lesser extent). The state establishes rules of the game, adopts laws, performs other functions understandable to everyone. The business produces values, creates jobs and pays taxes. With respect to the public sector and the most proactive part - civil society – there is no formed clear and meaningful vision of its role, contribution and favorable environment. Neither the state nor the business does not fully understand the role and objectives of the public sector, why its existence and level of development are not less important. At this stage it is meaningless to speak about the causes of this situation, it is wiser to take it as an evolutionary and objective reality and to address the challenge - to form the frameworks comprehensible to all parties for the contributions, roles and enabling environment for the public sector in order to ensure sustainable development of the Kyrgyz Republic taking into account the balanced contribution by the three leading drivers in the development. However, it requires much effort from the civil society itself - to create its contribution to sustainable development, find and publish indicators that demonstrate the accountability of civil society to its beneficiaries. Unfortunately, a common world practice on civil society accountability does not exist. That would be great to have a system to measure the contribution and accountability of the public sector.

E-discussion Facilitator from Brazil
Thu, March 24, 2016 at 09.04 pm

Thank you for your contribution. You argued that, for partnerships to foster sustainable development, both a "clear framework for cooperation and an enabling environment for operation of each of the parties" are necessary. You also suggested that the civil society in your country needs to make an effort not only to define its vision and role in the national development, but also to develop accountability mechanisms. What do think needs to be done for civil society to get organized in the Kyrgyz Republic so as to actively contribute to capacity building for development? What do you believe other stakeholders, such as the government, private sector and the UN can do to support civil society?

Hans Friederich Director-General of INBAR from China
Thu, March 24, 2016 at 01.28 am

Dear Moderator

INBAR has prepared the attached briefing notes for its 41 Member States to guide them in incorporating bamboo and rattan in their development plans for the future.  Bamboo and rattan are no solutions in isolation, but they should be included in the full spectrum of development options, as they can help achieve several SDGs.

Thank you for your attention

E-discussion Facilitator from Brazil
Thu, March 24, 2016 at 08.53 pm

Thank you for your contribution. In the briefing note you shared, the International Network for Bamboo and Rattan (INBAR) suggests how the production of bamboo and rattan can contribute to the achievement of several SDGs, from SDG 1 (end of poverty) to SDG 11 (Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable). The briefing note is good example of how partnerships can support knowledge and experience sharing. Could you give us more examples on how organizations such as INBAR can contribute to capacity building that supports the achievement of the SDGs?

The Private University for Medical Sciences
Thu, March 24, 2016 at 01.26 am

Hi..

As concern question number 2 (key areas for making progress on and building national and sub-national capacities for sustainable development) I can say that the most important key area is EDUCATION, by education & it's reform we can change a lot , knowledge, values & attitudes which is the most important of the people personality & skills which is also very important in preparing people for better future with a profession to help economically.

 

Another key element is the JUSTICE everywhere & in every aspect in order for other values to take it's place like tolerance & human rights. And most important for Justice is for women to take her role in leadership or work in general.

 

A third key area is helping the surpass person especially women to give the benefits of her capabilities to others by providing the healthy environment for her to be adopted & give her the chance to work .

 

4th key is to change the attitudes of leaders & decision makers about their way of chosing people for senior positions in the country tword abilities of person , capabilities, knowledge & experiences & not to rely that on "Wasta" & favoritism. 

 

For the other part of the question ( how do they differ across country contexts (e.g. least developed countries, middle income countries, high-income countries, countries in situations of fragility etc.) the difference is in the degree of implementation  & not in the elements involved.

 

For the last part of the same question (When and how can partnerships effectively contribute to capacity building and sustainable development?) I can say that partnerships can effectively contribute to sustainable development nationally & internationally when they asked for that formally from responsble persons & given the suitable reinfrocement & motives.


E-discussion Facilitator from Brazil
Thu, March 24, 2016 at 08.45 pm

Thank you for your comment. Regarding the role of partnerships in capacity building for development, you suggested that effective contribution can be offered when partners are formaly invited and motived by those responsible. Who/which organizations do you believe is/are responsible for furthering partnerships? How can "formal" partnerships be established in countries so as to effectively contribute to capacity building for development?

Marcotulio Humberto Cardona jovem from El Salvador
Wed, March 23, 2016 at 10.46 pm

Los ODS deben integrarse en los planes quinquenales de los gobiernos nacionales, municipales, locales, para que las politicas publicas funcionen y cumplan con los objetivos, hay varios objetivos que tienes que ver con la salud, con el medio ambiente, acabar con la pobreza, la educacion, una educacion gratuita y publica, derecho al agua, que haya paz que las instutuciones funcionen, que se cumpla la justicia, lo que faltaria es que haya dialogo y comunicacion entre los gobiernos y la sociedad civil y los movimientos sociales, que se velen y se respeten los derechos de las minorias, como son los adultos mayores, mujeres, jovenes, niños y niñas, migrantes

E-discussion Facilitator from Brazil
Thu, March 24, 2016 at 08.36 pm

Gracias por su participación. Usted ha sugerido que los ODS "deben integrarse en los planes quinquenales de los gobiernos nacionales, municipales, locales". Qué cree que es necesario para que los gobiernos, en todos los niveles, efectivamente incluyan los ODS en su planificación?

Además, has mencionado que, para que los derechos de las personas sean alcanzados, "lo que faltaria es que haya dialogo y comunicacion entre los gobiernos y la sociedad civil y los movimientos sociales". Qué hacer para que la sociedad civil, el sector privado y las demás partes interesadas participen activamente de la formulación de políticas públicas?

Reza Muhammad Muhammad Reza Sahib, National Coordinator of KRuHA (people's coalition for the right to water) from Indonesia
Wed, March 23, 2016 at 07.50 pm

Countries those who ratified the convenan on ECOSOC and Supporting the declaration of related rights (e.g right to water and sanitation) should make a progress report, national and International communities should work to push for it. Otherwise governments will manipulate the resources management reports to hide in the artificial crisis (crisis by design). Without such efforts, SDGs will be used only to involve private sector without maximum efforts by the government.

E-discussion Facilitator from Brazil
Thu, March 24, 2016 at 08.31 pm

Thank you for your comment. You mentioned that national and international communities should be involved in monitoring and pushing for the implementation of public policies on the 2030 Agenda. What do you believe needs to be done to ensure the participation of all stakeholders in the national implementation and progress monitoring for the SDGs?

Ruzanna Tarverdyan Ruzanna Tarverdyan is executive officer and founding president of the Geneva Consensus Foundation, devoted to promoting sustaina from Switzerland
Wed, March 23, 2016 at 06.33 pm

We submit that the solutions for Sustainable development in the interconnected Global world- two multiple dimensional phenomenon, entail a significant paradigm shift towards systems analysis and matrix thinking to address inter-temporal effectiveness-efficiency-equity challenges for future generations.

E-discussion Facilitator from Brazil
Thu, March 24, 2016 at 08.25 pm

Thank you for your contribution. Could you tell us more about how the frameworks you shared were designed? Do you believe their use can support the mainstreaming of the SDGs and also further stakeholders engagement in the national implementation of the 2030 Agenda?

Ruzanna Tarverdyan Ruzanna Tarverdyan is executive officer and founding president of the Geneva Consensus Foundation, devoted to promoting sustaina from Switzerland
Wed, March 23, 2016 at 06.32 pm

The economist as such does not advocate criteria of optimality. He may invent them. He may discuss their pros and cons, sometimes before but preferably after trying out their implications. But the ultimate choice is made…by the procedures of decision making inherent in the institutions, laws and customs of society. A wide range of professional competences enters into the preparation and deliberation of these decisions. To the extent that the economist takes part on this decisive phase, he does so in a double role, as economist, and a citizen of his polity: local polity, national polity or world Tjalling Koopmans, Nobel Memorial Lecture, 1975

E-discussion Facilitator from Brazil
Thu, March 24, 2016 at 08.21 pm

Thank you for your comment. Considering that a "wide range of professional competences enters into the preparation and deliberation of these decisions", how do you believe that the SDGs can be effectively mainstreamed into relevant national sustainable development policies and programmes, while preserving countries' policy space to pursue national priorities?

Jessie Lydia Henshaw Natural systems scientist, CIVICUS member from United States
Wed, March 23, 2016 at 05.56 pm

My thoughts are in the answer to these four questions:    My consulting credentials are in the attached resume'.

1.       What does it take to galvanize new cross-sectoral partnerships?

Jessie Henshaw: Partnerships are like families, everyone having the same and separate agendas, the cohesion from an ability to work as a whole, making decisions for the whole, different parties making differing independent contributions.  This same principle of “whole system design” applies to the world societies and cultures the SDG’s are designed to serve.  In the nature of whole systems, it becomes whole system development that moves the real welfare of any part.   So for the SDG’s, the goal of all partners should be to contribute to the development of the whole, leaving no constituency out, in each one’s different way.   

Case A: For example, UN monitored and regulated partnerships are needed to assure the system as a whole remains faithful to the UN mandate, and that the distribution of support makes the most use of it.   Just as in a family, those “top-down” partnerships need inspire and serve the “bottom-up” partnerships that will had more direct local understanding of the needs and abilities of societies as they seek to pull themselves together to grow and prosper as a whole.  

Case B: The nature of whole family or culture growth and development is a matter of discovery and sharing, from new points of view, often arising from seemingly ‘alien’ sources.  So everyone become a “knowledge worker” in that sense, alert to possible meanings of unfamiliar change and potential, much more of a “search process” than a “power play”.   So using what is called “big data” to locate interesting or surprising patterns, social, technological, institutional, like emerging trends of either “things working” or “things failing”, and having vital conversations everywhere, is needed to feed the genius of the cultures and letting it flow to where it’s needed.   It might very well be facilitated by a “knowledge extension service” in every region (i.e. mobile librarian perhaps, connecting local groups with knowledge resources) or other kinds of innovations, to make better use of the human creativity available from near and far.

2.       How can the UN system strengthen coherence and coordination of UN-led multi-stakeholder partnerships? What are the additional challenges involved in ensuring the transparency and accountability of cross-sectoral multi-stakeholder partnerships, and how can these be addressed?

Jessie Henshaw:  The “whole system” approach expands the “nexus” idea to the limit, seeing “development” not as a list of projects at all, but as a way of supporting the growth of human cultures by self-determination, inspired and aided by the UN vision and programs, but to achieve their own ends, the securing of their homes and fulfillment of their own way of life.   This new way of interpreting the SDG’s, as for inspiring and enabling the cultural growth, development and security of human societies, in effect conceptually turns “inside out” the statement of the UN SDG plan, which had been described as being for promoting targeted interventions in struggling societies, to push and prod them to achieve certain “targets”.     

 It makes each culture’s own growth in seeking its own way of life
the “nexus” of every single one of the SDG goals and targets.

The real “nexus” of any successful economic or social development is always the success of the developing culture’s ambitions itself, making the role of all the goals, targets, outside governments and organizations secondary.  Their principal job in fostering the SDG’s would be to condone, respect and give heartfelt support to each society’s own culture’s self-fulfillment.

The most natural way to do that is to recognize the natural “nexus” of each developing culture as a whole.   “The real “nexus” of any successful economic or social development is always the success of the developing culture’s ambitions itself, making the role of all the goals, targets, outside governments and organizations secondary.  Their principal job in fostering the SDG’s would be to condone, respect and give heartfelt support to each society’s own culture’s self-fulfillment.


3.       How can multi-stakeholder partnerships involving the United Nations be more transparent and accountable?

Jessie Henshaw: Learning to act in a way that is transparent to other actors, and to the cultures within which one is acting, is a rather tall order.   So far all the expert measurement groups in the sciences and at the UN that I’ve tried to work with, actually seem to have rebelled against starting to be transparent regarding the actual scale of cultural and ecological impacts we are responsible for as a result of using money.   It’s a highly solvable accounting problem, based on how we keep track of money and use it so widely to organize so much of society.   So given that, a very simple principle of accounting for “average” cases can be also adjusted for “exceptions”.

“Average shares of benefits of a whole system for producing them
has average shares of responsibility for the costs.”   

No one wants to do it though, as it would mean “internalizing all externalities” of the economy in a very visible way.


In effect it would sweep out all “the elephants from under the carpet” we’ve been storing up, hiding all the side effects of altering the earth in ever bigger ways ever faster... as if saved for some  future day.  The scientific purpose would be to just have an honest accounting of what we are choosing to do with our financial decisions.  I think we’d quickly find that with a holistic view of what clearly measurable costs to our future our spending is accumulating today…  we would realize every dollar is making lasting changes to the earth.  We’d be still glad to have them, but would become cautions and in a stepwise fashion begin to think much more carefully what we do with them.

There are other kinds of transparency too.   It’s hard for different organizations to be transparent with each other, as they all think differently, for one thing.   Most of the time the standard of “truth” people use is what I call the “economic standard”, presenting things in the most profitable way to the presenter.  There is another kind, the  “trust standard”.   The trust standard is to be “not-misleading”, as an offer to correct or clarify if what was said turns out to be misinterpreted.   It’s oddly the standard practice in designing computers, that any message sent is checked to see if it was received, to not be misleading.    If organizations agreed to the “trust standard” they’d quickly learn they could challenge anyone who, as is common practice today, effectively “telling the biggest fib they can get away with”, using the “economic standard” of the truth.   

4.       How can the UN improve its due diligence, monitoring and review of its partnerships that contribute to the implementation of the 2030 Agenda?

 

Jessie Henshaw: If the objective is not to serve the UN, per se, but to serve the growth and development of each culture being inspired and enabled to seek its own purposes, it would seem to greatly complicate the monitoring.  It could be seen as very usefully dividing the job in two.   There’s 1) the communicating to and getting feedback from the culture being served, then 2) the internal accounting of agencies for how well they themselves think they used their resources.   That may indeed greatly simplify the task in the end.

E-discussion Facilitator from Brazil
Thu, March 24, 2016 at 08.16 pm

Thank you for your participation. The questions you addressed will be further discussed during the 2016 ECOSOC Partnership Forum “From commitments to results: Leveraging partnerships for the 2030 Agenda”, qhich wil be held at the United Nations Headquarters on March 31st, 2016. For more information on the 2016 ECOSOC Partnership Forum, please check: https://www.un.org/ecosoc/en/node/355639.

Mohammed Eid Operations Coordinator from Palestine (State of) *
Wed, March 23, 2016 at 05.15 pm

Speaking about making progress on and building national and sub-national capacities for sustainable development, and how can partnerships effectively contribute to capacity building and sustainable development;  

I think its very critical to take into consideration the advocacy issue, less people are involved due to the lack of proper advocacy. Speaking of one the UN agencies where I work, at the UNRWA many of the programs are doomed to fail due to lack of involvement. Only few people are aware of the goals and aims, and I can certainly confirm that many of the stakeholders has not heard of 2030 agenda and its sub-goals
We need to put the people in the driving seat, we need to involve them more often in a way that will inform them more often about the main goals and the sustainability plans. 
Programs should not be cut out of the context, and help should be sought from the media to keep the people informed about the plans, the agenda and the progress made so far.

 

E-discussion Facilitator from Brazil
Thu, March 24, 2016 at 07.43 pm

Thank you for your comment. Some of the other participants in our e-discussion have mentioned the role of media, such as radio in rural areas, as a tool to keep people informed and further discussions/actions on the SDGs. What do you think are the main obstacles to stakeholders to put forth proper advocacy on the 2030 Agenda? How can the stakeholders overcome such obstacles?

Priscilla DRR Programme Officer from Kenya
Sat, March 26, 2016 at 02.39 pm

Though not directed to me this question, in that we experience the same problem , I will respond with what I have observed to be the obstacle. Starting with the basics , being lack of clear communication strategy , clarity on whom the target is and the message we want to pass. At most the technical people in any field do not simplify their technical words and thus most of the audience who are not in that field loose interest, however good the technical document is if the target group cannot understand it then it looses interest and this has been one of the problems in our advocacy and especially to policy makers, thus you end up communicating to your group only. Thus the rules of having an advocacy strategy and for technical staff ensuring communication depts are fully part of the process will be important among ourselves if simply I put SDGs is ok but to someone else this abbreviation just locks him/her out. Let our advocacy have clear strategy of what. Whom to,How and when we want to advocate. 2nd is on use of data, putting on so much.with no clear interpretation. Let's get into habit of involving the communication people's to proof read in particular documents to external readers and always ensure the data used if any is minimal just for enhancing the information provided. Thank you.Priscilla

E-discussion Facilitator from Brazil
Sun, March 27, 2016 at 11.32 pm

Thank you for your comment. Improving advocacy can further engagement and ownership.

Rita Luthra from
Sun, March 27, 2016 at 03.11 am

Please remove my e-mail from your mailing list

 

Thank you

 

 

Rita Luthra, MD

President

Women's Health and Education Center (WHEC)

NGO in Special Consultative Status with Economic and Social Council of the United Nations

Editor-in-Chief of e-Health Publication

http://www.WomensHealthSection.com

 

From: notification@unteamworks.org [mailto:notification@unteamworks.org]
Sent: Saturday, March 26, 2016 11:06 AM
To: rita@womenshealthsection.com
Subject: [World We Want 2030] Priscilla DRR Programme Officer from Kenya commented on the Discussion "National Implementation"

 

Susan Roylance International Policy and Social Development Coordinator
Wed, March 23, 2016 at 03.44 pm

Please acknowledge that the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development is “grounded in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights” (paragraph 10-13) which states that “The family is the natural and fundamental group unit of society," and the World Summit for Social Development and twenty-fourth special session of the General Assembly state that the family “plays a key role in social development" (Social Summit, 26-b and twenty-fourth special session of the General Assembly, para 25 and 56).
As we empower the family unit to achieve the SDGs millions of groups will work together to accomplish the important goals and targets. If government only treats people as individuals, the burden is on government to produce. As governments empower family units, the burden on government is reduced, and the result is sustainable development!

Susan Roylance International Policy and Social Development Coordinator
Wed, March 23, 2016 at 03.42 pm

Acknowledge that the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development is “grounded in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights” which states that “The family is the natural and fundamental group unit of society," and the World Summit for Social Development and twenty-fourth special session of the General Assembly state that the family “plays a key role in social development" (Social Summit, 26-b and twenty-fourth special session of the General Assembly, para 25 and 56).

As we empower the family unit to achieve the SDGs millions of groups will work togther to accomplish the important goals and targets.  If government on ly treats people as individuals, the burden is on government to produce.  As the government empowers family units, the burden on government is reduced, and the result is sustainable development!

E-discussion Facilitator from Brazil
Thu, March 24, 2016 at 07.20 pm

Thank you for your comment. How do you believe families can be mobilized to support the process of mainstreaming the SDGs into national policy/strategies?

BNEIJARA Directeur from Mauritania
Mon, March 21, 2016 at 12.34 pm

Bonjour

 Les messages clés qui ressortent de toutes les contributions dans cette phase de concertation en ligne pour  la mise en œuvre des ODD sont les suivants : La mise en œuvre des ODD est un exercice politique qui exige un leadership de haut niveau (NU)aussi bien dans les organisations régionales  qu’au sein des gouvernements des pays, afin d’optimiser l’impact des interventions et leur conformité avec les principales priorités nationales selon une approche collective convenue qui puisse répondre aux spécificités des pays. Il est nécessaire d’être sensible aux priorités essentielles afin d’obtenir des résultats visibles et renforcer la confiance entre les différents acteurs. La bonne coordination  peut aider à sceller des engagements communs à ces priorités essentielles, mais cela  ne peut être efficace que si  les interventions sont assemblées. Pour réaliser de réels progrès sur le terrain. Les efforts visant à mettre en œuvre les ODD doivent passer d’un dialogue global à une action au niveau national. Cela suppose d’établir des objectifs clairs, l’élaboration de feuilles de route convenues pour la mise en œuvre, le suivi et l'évaluation conjointe  (examen) des risques et le suivi des progrès.

 

Les objectifs de consolidation doivent être mis en avant et à ce moment précis de de l’engagement mondial sur les ODD par la réalisation commune de la planification, du suivi, et donc d’une reddition de comptes mutuelle.

La mise en œuvre des ODD exige de mettre davantage l'accent sur un ensemble plus restreint de priorités, sur une compréhension commune des facteurs de faiblesse et de sources de résilience. La transparence de l'aide est une condition minimale pour forger des partenariats plus solides. La mise à jour des systèmes de gestion et d’information de l'aide publique au développement, doit obligatoirement être  intégrée dans les processus de planification et de budgétisation nationale et accompagnés d’efforts pour améliorer la gestion des finances publiques, la participation active des gouvernements,  des organisations de la société civile, des partenaires au développement NU devrait être une étape essentielle pour la propriété de l'Agenda 2030, sa mise en œuvre et ses résultats. Le développement des pays relève en premier lieu des gouvernements. Sans appropriation des ODD à la fois des gouvernements et de leur population les résultats ne seront jamais obtenus. Ces ODD ne pourront être atteints que par l’adoption de nouvelles stratégies et priorités politiques nationales. Confectionnés par la communauté internationale, ils doivent être assimilés par les gouvernements locaux oui ils ont signé et approuvé mais cela n’est pas suffisant une campagne de sensibilisation mondiale est nécessaire. La responsabilité première pour réaliser ces objectifs et les cibles revienne aux gouvernements des pays, tous les acteurs de la vie nationale doivent être impliqués. A travers les associations communautaires et professionnelles, les groupes de femmes et les organisations non gouvernementales, c’est la société civile dans son ensemble qui doit participer aux différentes étapes de la réalisation des ODD. 

E-discussion Facilitator from Brazil
Mon, March 21, 2016 at 09.14 pm

Merci pour votre commentaire. Vous avez mentionné certains intervenants qui ont besoin d'être impliqués dans la mise en œuvre des ODD (associations professionnelles, groupes de femmes ..). Que pensez-vous devrait être fait pour engager les parties prenantes dans le partage d'informations et d'expériences? Pouvez-vous nous donner des exemples concrets?

Hydroaid - Water for Development Management Institute
Mon, March 21, 2016 at 11.59 am

Today, more than ever, administrations are called to focus on environmental and climate issues, in spite of critical financial and political conditions. However, the real possibility of approving and eventually implementing policies that concretely address the environmental crisis, fight climate change as well as match development needs, is limited. Local institutions, in particular, tend to be motivated only if economically convenient or under considerable pressure. More frequently, dealing with major environmental problems requires large investments in terms of time and money, although it produces benefits that will be measured for generations to come. 


Hydroaid – Water for Development Management Institute was founded in 2001 with the mission of contributing to the consolidation of efficient, integrated and sustainable water resources management systems in developing and emerging countries through training and capacity building in areas characterized by severe environmental and climate vulnerabilities. As an Association, it is composed by both public and private members – including local and regional administrations – and this particular structure provides it with precious insights on the processes that link commitments on water cooperation to actions, and actions to results, within public institutions and partners. This point of view and the experience developed on the roadmap to the Millennium Development Goals brought us to formulate 5 directions where public institutions could expand their reach in order to facilitate the implementation of the new Sustainable Development Goals (SDG), with a special focus on SDG 6.1 (By 2030, achieve universal and equitable access to safe and affordable drinking water for all) and 6.b (Support and strengthen the participation of local communities in improving water and sanitation management): 


1. Empowering participation opportunities of local groups and entities in the proposal, discussion and formulation of development policies. Participative processes find a productive ground in the work that has been carried out so far by proactive organizations and their networks, which represent both a background and an asset for increased accountability and commitment. Enhanced engagement and sense of responsibility of the entities involved - and of the administrations that must coordinate them - derives from feeling a part of a larger forum and has positive outputs on the improvement of life quality standards through the protection and effective management of threatened natural resources, such as water. 


2. Targeting beneficiaries in an effective way to address all local interests and needs, stimulate community participation and sense of project ownership that facilitate the realization of cooperation efforts. Appropriately targeted groups become active members of decision making mechanisms and of the development processes tackling the criticalities of their living environment. Moreover a better management of natural resources inevitably begins from a better management of human resources and their ability to disseminate acquired best practices and know-how. Targeting can be improved through proper monitoring and impact evaluation of activities, particularly by the setup of an inclusive and circular feedback harvesting system where the inputs collected are used to increase the efficiency and stakeholders’ involvement of future initiatives. 


3. Improving engagement and communications among exprts and scientists in support of development policies and interventions such as in the case of integrated planning and governance of environmental resources that require interdisciplinary expertise and flexible approaches. The creation of dialogue and sharing platforms should be intended as a tool for supporting capacity development processes in which knowledge is transformed into skills that are, in turn, converted into actions. 


4. Promoting jobs for sustainability as a goal of institutions supporting the employment sector and improving the governance of natural resources. This is a loop system that allows public administrations to provide more opportunities to citizens, and an opportunity for administrations themselves to optimize their services and the state of local environment. Both employment and environment are facing a crisis as well as sustainability challenges that could find at least a partial solution in the activation of such a system and its ability to produce benefits in the long term. Effective management of water resources and urban solid waste are examples of areas where investments could be greatly developed and bring even higher advantages, turning a weakness into strength. Considering the rapid evolution of technical and technological solutions in these fields as well as the needs for sound organization, coordination and monitoring, training is a key issue here too. Professional training, in particular, is the tool that paves the way for new jobs where the acquired skills find a concrete application, thus completing the circle. 


5. Developing preparedness and disaster management strategies to cope with humanitarian and environmental emergencies. In view of the current events and transformations – such as droughts and conflicts, causing local instability and increasingly frequent migration waves – precautionary planning and prompt action are able to reinforce institutions while protecting natural resources at risk. Policies for promoting leadership approaches inspired to resilience and responsibility are the basis for responding to uncontrolled or unpredicted trends. In addition to this, setting up specialized staff for monitoring, prevention and emergency action is a way to do so, while at the same time creating new opportunities, inclusion and stability at the local level. 


These are some of the reasons why Hydroaid strives to support development processes with managers and technicians as beneficiaries. Among our training participants were operators of municipalities, utilities and public administrations – ideal target groups to maximize the impacts of the transferred knowledge and know-how – committed to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of their institutions and communities. 
Policies for sustainability can drive institutions towards better management of resources and communities; similarly, individuals and groups orient their behaviors according to a shared vision that can be inspired by them. Solid administrations with the support and engagement of local communities, public/private partnerships and stakeholders are more likely to withstand shocks and pressures caused by human or environmental stress while contributing to the achievement of the SDGs.

E-discussion Facilitator from Brazil
Tue, March 22, 2016 at 06.37 pm

Thank you for your comment. You have described guidelines developed by Hydroaid for public institutions to expand their reach in order to facilitate the implementation of the SDGs. In your experience, do you believe they can also be used to help mainstream the 2030 Agenda into national development policies?

ONG: Amis des Etrangers au Togo: ADET
Mon, March 21, 2016 at 10.18 am

L'implémentation nationale des ODD est simple:Il faut créer un Conseil national des ODD qui doit regrouper les membre du gouvernement, la société civile vraiment engagée dans les ODD, le système des Nations Unies et les autres groupes majeurs. Mais ce conseil ne doit pas être politisé. Ce conseil doit travailler avec les autres partenaires locales(autorités locales, les autorités nationales, les jeunes, les femmes, les personnes handicapées, les personnes âgées, les migrants, les peuples autochtones, les autres minoritées et sur la base des données statistiques. Le conseil national aura pour document de travail les ODD.

E-discussion Facilitator from Brazil
Mon, March 21, 2016 at 09.22 pm

Merci pour votre commentaire. La création d'un conseil national des OMD pourrait non seulement aider à surmonter les problèmes de coordination mais aussi soutenir la participation des stakeholders dans la mise en œuvre de l'Agenda 2030. Selon votre expérience/opinion, comment le conseil national des ODD soit organisé de manière à maximiser les ressources et maintenir l'intérêt et la participation des différents stakeholders?

Henry Nnadozie Ekwuruke " Human rights activist/writer, blogger & entrepreneur /" Executive Director at Development Generation Africa International from Nigeria
Sun, March 20, 2016 at 01.12 pm

Nigeria is our nation. We want it's prosperity and the UN can help us as we help each other.

If the UN Development System stands ready to assist Nigeria to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and our other national priorities. We thank the UN and urge them to respect and encourage national ownership of the processes "time is greater than space", what does Nigeria need and what is our national capacity, UNDP should help us. Our efforts must be flexible to adapt to Nigeria's contexts, particularly our struggle with insecurity and consumption and production as well as energy poverty!


We need to understand our issues and engage the 'real'people for impact. Involve the civil society,involve women and youths. Everyone's insight will be highly needed like never before! Thank you.
E-discussion Facilitator from Brazil
Mon, March 21, 2016 at 09.25 pm

Thank you for your comment. What do you think are the key areas for making progress on and building national and sub-national capacities for sustainable development in Nigeria?

Henry Nnadozie Ekwuruke " Human rights activist/writer, blogger & entrepreneur /" Executive Director at Development Generation Africa International from Nigeria
Mon, March 21, 2016 at 10.36 pm

The key area is a strong political will from the President. Cooperation must we our watch-word across all sectors and we must be responsible in managing our people. UN Development System in Nigeria have a vital role to play particularly with helping our legislators to understand the goals. As a participant in the road and the UN Summit for the adoption of the SDGs in September in New York, I listened to my President speak passionately and he walked his talk by making Amina Mohammed our Minister for Environment, she will know what to do! All 36 States must be reached and faster. The civil society have to be empowered to get to work and that is it. Thank you Moderator.

E-discussion Facilitator from Brazil
Tue, March 22, 2016 at 06.21 pm

Tyank you for your comment. Other participants of our e-discussion have also stressed out the role of parliaments in addressing the SDGs. In that regard, I invite you to check the Week 3 summaries that have been posted.

Henry Nnadozie Ekwuruke " Human rights activist/writer, blogger & entrepreneur /" Executive Director at Development Generation Africa International from Nigeria
Sat, March 19, 2016 at 07.43 pm

At the DGAi, we are practical and we think that what is most important is not talk but action. Our job moves forward when we do it. National implementation is a job for a "doing" presidet and all relevant stakeholders. We propose the creation of "Action 2030" Ministry at the national level to move the SDGs from commitment to results, from talk to concrete action. Thank you

Priscilla DRR Programme Officer from Kenya
Sun, March 20, 2016 at 09.49 am

Hi Henry , thank you for your input and the need for result oriented lookout. However tend to wonder whether or not an extra ministry will make the agenda move. What I think ,is having the SDGs where so far have not yet been embedded into any ministry be included in the highest ministry that has more power and authority, thus this should be in the offices of the President or Prime minister . The SDGs cuts across all the ministries and thus should be governed from the top for coherence across all sectors and vertically from the National to the Grassroots . The creation of an extra ministry may make the SDGs just be an agenda of that ministry rather than for the Nation as a whole. I see the role of civil society organizations very key in ensuring the agenda implementation moves in full force and monitoring too for achievement of its goal, civil society groups should remain the eyes and voice of the people in particular those whose voices are never heard. Last when you say you are practical what tools or how do you ensure you achieve your goals despite the resource competitive world we are in? How do you ensure the state/it's ministries delivers and communities are fully engaged? Thank you . Priscilla

Henry Nnadozie Ekwuruke " Human rights activist/writer, blogger & entrepreneur /" Executive Director at Development Generation Africa International from Nigeria
Sun, March 20, 2016 at 12.58 pm

Hi Priscillia, I write to inform you that your namesake in our office just game birth to a baby girl 6 hours ago! We are working towards engaging the legislators in building transparency and accountability across the SDGs and we already started the distribution of the Agenda 2030 to relevant stakeholders. My state government is working on that lead with the document! We aim to reach the University Vice Chancellors across Nigeria to make them Champions of the Goals and our own Agenda 2063!

At the DGAi, we wanted a new ministry to face the agenda head-on and we recognise your point and we may have a rethink. We want no one to be left behind, we want inclusive and not exclusivity. At DGAi, we work with responsibility, cooperation, vision, selfless, fraternity and solidarity and courage. This is our success. Communities wants involved and must be included. It is a matter of awareness and action then participation leads to responsibility. We have formed a volunteer front "Torchbearers of #SDGs" they manifest the SDGs and work for sustainable development through self-help and promotion of sustainable community development led by women and youth.

We aspire to a society where better services, including basic health and education is a reality for all. We know we can! Thank you and let's do it together.

Priscilla DRR Programme Officer from Kenya
Sun, March 20, 2016 at 07.09 pm

Thank you Henry and the good news of my name sake, my congratulations to her and the family and welcome the Baby Girl. This should motivate us more to ensure the set goals enable every New Child in this world despite their gender, background is in a better place, a well organized and a caring, planned environment than we found it, especially in the LDCs let's say no more to poverty and inequality. Reason why partnerships and coordination among the various sectors and our politics have to move into a higher level from what we have observed, defining clearly the rules for engagement and letting humanity be what it was intended to be .National level commitment to achieve SDGs among the various sectors, private and public should be endorsed at this level and not just assumed, partnership with clear legal mandate where one accounts for the progress they make! All the very best with the initiatives in place and hopefully midway in implementation we shall have another online opportunity to tell our successful stories. Thank you . Priscilla

Henry Nnadozie Ekwuruke " Human rights activist/writer, blogger & entrepreneur /" Executive Director at Development Generation Africa International from Nigeria
Sat, March 19, 2016 at 06.47 pm

Thank you all for your great contributions. Some of our staff at Development Generation Africa (DGAi) believe we have to promote understanding of the #SDGs with the common man's language and our Chief Administrative Officer, Austin Eluwa opined that, "no president, no leader or emperor is going to achieve the #SDGs except with the people, powered by women and youth." He also talked of the experience of the 'elders' in monitoring, implementing the goals. Let's move for those results now. Together! Thank you.

 

Henry Ekwuruke, Executive Officer at DGAi

NGO in Consultative Status with ECOSOC and promotes social dialogue and human rights!

E-discussion Facilitator from Brazil
Mon, March 21, 2016 at 01.22 pm

Thank you for your contribution. Does your organization have suggestions on how to engange stakeholders in the exchange information and experiences that could help achieve the SDGs?

Henry Nnadozie Ekwuruke " Human rights activist/writer, blogger & entrepreneur /" Executive Director at Development Generation Africa International
Mon, March 21, 2016 at 10.47 pm

To engage stakeholders and share information and experiences effectively for the achievement of the SDGs, I asked two of my colleagues for input and they responded in a timely manner: 

WE have to reach our networks and inform them; organise forums; utilize the social media and traditional media and get leaders to endorse the goals and "lead by example", people need to discuss and take action together. During the international women's day in Nigeria, DGAi installed some women as "Torchbearers of the #SDGs" with the Solar Light we used in New York! They have since helped spread the message to their colleagues and networks and in the media. We can do more with better support and motivation. We have to educate and create awareness within the Partners for Peace Network and other circles like involving my Bishop in Church to talk about the goals. We also want "habits" changed. Thanks

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